The Disco Files

The Disco Files 1973-78 is a new book by Vince Aletti and djhistory.com, to be released April 20 (pre-order here). It sounds very much like a new nerd bible, containing Vince’s weekly reports from New York”™s club scene, his magazine articles, 800 club and DJ charts and tons of record reviews.

Aletti was the first person to write about disco in an article published in Rolling Stone in 1973. He became a senior editor at The Village Voice, and is currently the photography critic for The New Yorker.

The 30 page pdf preview of the book includes an excerpt of his ’73 disco article and some great pictures. Some of the pictures might look familiar, as they have been published in the other disco bible Love Saves The Day by Tim Lawrence.

The D Files

From an interview with Vince Aletti:

Did people at [Paradise] Garage regard the Studio 54 as the anti-Christ?
To an extent. I certainly did. It was not what we thought this was all about. David’s [Mancuso] idealism was very widespread in terms of the way people felt. I think disco was, to some extent, a movement and a lot of people felt very strongly. And a lot of people got very caught up in what they felt it should and shouldn’t be.

What was the reaction when Studio 54 took off?
It’s hard for me to say, besides what I already said. There’s a scene at the end of the Last Days Of Disco one of the characters has this very idealistic speech where he says disco was a whole movement. It was funny, but it was really true and people felt that. They felt disappointed that the idealistic quality of it was being trampled over, in favour of money and celebrity. As much as disco was glitzy and certainly loved celebrity culture when people came to clubs, there was never a sense of it being driven by that. It was much more driven by an underground idea of unity.

(via disco delivery & more information)

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